Books worth chewing on: Win two tickets to the first NY Food Book Fair!

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It’s festival season here in Brooklyn: you foodies have Great Googamooga, you lit nerds have Lit Crawl, but what about if you like both literature and food? Get ready for the first-ever New York Food Book Fair, which is taking over the new Wythe Hotel in Greenpoint all weekend. The fest features panels, meals and a bunch of authors and authors talking about just about anything you could want to know about the intersection of food and culture, including food and porn, avant garde cooking, food-inspired changes in technology and more. The authors appearing include Harold McGee (On Food and CookingThe Science and Lore of the Kitchen), Dr. Marion Nestle (Why Calories Count, Food Politics) and  Carolyn Steel (Hungry City: How Food Shapes Our Lives) and many more. Tickets for the panels are $15 each, but we’ve got a pair of full festival passes to give out to Brokelyn readers (a $430 value)! Details below.

To enter, just set up a Brokelyn profile if you don’t have one already (click on the word “register” near the top right hand corner of the site); then put a comment below telling us your favorite food book. It could be a cookbook, novel, Pollan-wanna-be, whatever. We’ll randomly select a winner by 5pm Thursday. 

Find more about the fair on Facebook and Twitter.

 

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44 COMMENTS

  1. The Neon Rain by James Lee Burke… this is first in a series of books featuring Dave Robicheaux…they are set in and around New Orleans, and the way he describes the food in his books…oh my goodness… i dream of red beans and rice, crawfish, beignets everytime i read him.

  2. “Hints and Pinches” by Eugene Walter is not only one of my favorite food books, but one of my favorite books, period. Endlessly informative & amusing. Eugene Walter is a national treasure.

  3. “Modernist Cuisine” is my current favourite, but McGee’s “On Food and Cooking” was my first introduction to the science of food and cooking.

  4. My favorite food book is “Home Cooking: A Writer in the Kitchen,” by Laurie Colwin. Such great stories about living in tiny NY apartments, and I love her recipe for sweet potato pancakes!

  5. My favorite cookbook is “Living and Eating” by John Pawson & Annie Bell. Or any of the Canal Street cookbooks! Such beautiful photography and simple recipes.

  6. Blood, Bones & Butter by Gabrielle Hamilton (Bourdain’s fave food memoir, for what that’s worth) + The Hungover Cookbook by Milton Crawford. Oh, please please please, let me let me let me, get what I want, etc. #godknowsitwouldbethefirsttime

  7. This is random, but my favorite has to be my grandmother’s copy of The Mary Frances Cookbook: Adventures Among the Kitchen People, by Jane Eayre Fryer – mainly for the awesome illustrations. And because I love that 100 years ago someone imagined her kitchen utensils as people.

  8. How to Cook Everything by Mark Bittman. I try other cookbooks but always come back to this one. And also Bread and Jam for Francis, the children’s book. I had a record of it being read and hearing the description of hard boiled eggs and jam sandwiches as a kid used to make me hungry.

  9. Curye on Inglysch: Middle English recipes
    Early English Text Society Supplementary Series

    earliest English recipes and food etiquette, from the 14th century on, compiled from more than 20 medieval manuscripts

  10. Fonda San Miguel: Thirty Years of Food and Art. An Austin, TX favorite – beautiful cookbook that belongs as much on the coffee table as in the kitchen.

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