Brooklyn now officially too crazy for New Orleans

Excuse us, but this is a modest, family town. via Flickr user Marcy014

Excuse us, but this is a modest, family town. via Flickr user Marcy014

For all of our celebration of Brooklyn’s nightlife, with its almost non-existent last calls and bars on every corner, it never seemed like it could hold a candle to New Orleans. In New Orleans, last call is non-existent and you can wander the French Quarter, drink in hand. But DNA Info says, now, a group of residents is finally putting their foot down, drawing the line at a Habana Outpost, um, outpost, going up in the French Quarter.It would be one thing if the people behind Save Our Neighborhood were fighting the idea of “New York transplants coming to our city,” which would be a fun irony, or even if they just didn’t want Cuban food. But instead the NIMBY group is complaining that Habana Outpost would bring noise and trash and a lower quality of life to the French Quarter. Which, hey, we’re not from there, so we’re not going to immediately laugh. Just chuckle a little at the idea that a Brooklyn restaurant and nightlife would be the thing that pushed New Orleans from “decadent travel destination” to “decadent hellhole.”

12 Comment

  • The reason people are against it is because the French Quarter is already full of bars and tourists. The area below Jackson Square is the only part left with a true residential/local feel and people would like to preserve that. Sorry we don’t want carpet baggers coming in and trashing what’s left of our most historic neighborhood so that they can make a quick buck and take it all back to NYC.

    • Serious question: do people from fun Southern cities call people who move there carpetbaggers? Or do they call them transplants like we do here?

      • We say transplants. But, I just like to use that word sometimes to make a point.

      • You’re also all Yankees to us, whether you’re from The Bronx, Philly, Boston, or Maine. We don’t think there are any considerable differences between you.

  • It seems innocuous, but come to think of it they did have a huge near-riot at their annual block party in Ft. Greene last year. The streets were overflowing with people and cops were everywhere trying to chase everyone out. Not sure if that’s crazier that what normally happens in NOLA, but maybe they just don’t sell enough drinks in plastic things that could easily be turned into bongs for the New Orleans crowd.

    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8SdW-osZ5Y

      NYC cops just don’t have the wherewithal and crowd control capabilities to handle Who Dats. They shoulda gone Full Bourbon on them: lined up at one end of the block, foot police, followed by mounted, followed by squad cars, and just moved from one end to the other, telling people to get the fuck home.

      Arbitrary beatings with night-sticks are also a tried-and-true NOLA cop favorite.

      • Yes, because that’s what the entire city of New Orleans looks like all the time. We’re just so darn crazy “down here.”

        • Well, much to my dismay, the Saints don’t win the Super Bowl all the time. And the cops don’t go into the full court press much outside of midnight Fat Tuesday. But I’m fairly certain the beatings are still a regular practice, despite Landrieu bringing in the Justice Dept to clean shop. So that remains “kinda” crazy.

    • The point is that we don’t want that on a quieter section of the city. The only area in the city that happens is Bourbon Street, and this proposed restaurant/bar is not that on or near the craziness that is Bourbon. Not a single local wants any more bars that cater to drunk tourists. Us locals do not visit Bourbon Street or places like it. The city is actually a lovely place and if people would venture off of Bourbon once in a while they would know that.

  • As you say, you’re not from here. About half of the French Quarter is completely residential, and pretty quiet. This place would go in one corner of the Quarter, far from Bourbon Street, and right in the middle of a quiet residential area. I usually have pretty ambivalent feelings in these “residents versus businesses” issues, but I don’t think Mr. Meenan picked an appropriate for a large, busy, loud restaurant. A little pizza joint, or poboy shop would probably be welcome on that corner, but not what Mr. Meenan has in mind. But then, HE’s not from here either. So what does he know?