Beirut, War on Drugs announce Williamsburg waterfront shows at Northside Festival

beirut band

Set sail for summer with Beirut. via Facebook

Snow be damned, summer is on its way here. That’s what we’re sticking with anyway, and that’s what the news cycle is sticking with. So, here is some great summer news: Williamsburg waterfront venue 50 Kent, (North 12th Street and Kent Avenue) formerly Williamsburg Park, will be hosting performances by both Beirut and the War on Drugs during the upcoming Northside Festival. Go ahead snow, just try to fall on that, we dare you.

Per a press release, the War on Drugs will be taking the stage on Friday, June 13 (not at all ominous given the ominous weather predicted for the summer), to be followed the next day by a show by Beirut in what will be their only Brooklyn appearance all summer. What are they, suddenly too good for us or something? Sadly, 50 Kent or Williamsburg Park or whatever it’s gonna end up being named a year from now doesn’t have the great places for free listening like East River State Park did back when there was music there, so we suppose shelling out either $20 or $35 respectively for each show is your only choice.

On the other hand, since the shows are a part of Northside, you could also just get yourself a music badge for just $65, and have it pay for itself by seeing these shows and then just one more. And considering the lineup features the likes of Talib Kweli, Albert Hammond, Jr., The Dead Milkmen, Eleanor Friedberger, Omar Souleyman, Dan Croll, Eagulls, Mas Ysa, Sharon Van Etten, Fuck Buttons, Courtney Barnett, Titus Andronicus, Beach Fossils and weirdo local heroes Ava Luna, we’re sure you’ll find more than just one extra show to check out. Plus, with a badge, you won’t have to jostle in a line to get into that free CHVRCHES show at McCarren Park.

All in all, plenty of reasons to stay right here in Brooklyn this summer, where even if it is a rainy miserable summer like those hacks at the Farmers Almanac say it’s gonna be, at least you’ll be somewhere familiar.