Become an underground artist: Here’s your chance to design art for Brooklyn subway stations

Nitehawk is taking over the Pavilion Theater, giving hope not everything will become condos eventuallyNitehawk is taking over the Pavilion Theater, giving hope not everything will become condos eventuallyNitehawk is taking over the Pavilion Theater, giving hope not everything will become condos eventually

Andrea Dezsö, “Community Garden”, 2006, is found at the Bedford Park Blvd station. The MTA is seeking new artists for Brooklyn stations. Via Facebook.

You might not appreciate it in between bouts of playing tunnel peekaboo with the R train or gaping at these mind-numbingly pandering advertisements, but subway stations can be great places to take in some art. And by that we mean both the creatively graffitied subway billboards that turn Kevin Can Wait into Kevin Can PENIS, and also the officially sanctioned subway art like the kaleidoscope in Dekalb Avenue tunnel or the tile murals, lights and sculptures you see elsewhere. How do that art get there? It comes from creative and attractive people like you!

The MTA is currently seeking submissions for artists who want to see their work adorn five Brooklyn subway stations. The opportunity means your art can become a permanent part of the city infrastructure, and you’ll get paid a few thousand bucks too. 

The submission period is open through midnight Sept. 30. To apply, the MTA wants you to submit up to 20 images of your previous work along with a short application form, a bio/CV and brief artist statement. You can apply online here.

The program is seeking to install art in either a glass or mosaic form along the N line at five stations in Brooklyn: 8 Av, 18 Av, 20 Av, Bay Pkwy, 86 St. They’ll use an approved fabricator to do the final work so you don’t have to have any experience in creating subway tile mosaics or stained glass or whatever.

So you submit your past work, and if chosen by the selection panel of arts and design professionals, you’ll be given site specifications so you can create a new mural idea or proposal for original artwork to adorn the space. The budget for the project could be as high as $230,000, and you can receive a 20 percent artist fee of the final cost, plus a $1,000 honorarium. One artist per station will be selected.

If you actually get the MTA to select your Kevin James sitcom graffiti, I think you should get paid extra, just saying.

Find all the info you need here.

[h/t Sunset Park Voice]