Grab some canned goods to give to the Brooklyn Eats Cares food drive

food drive

Let’s put this one to shame. via Flickr user Jinx!

It can be hard to remember sometimes, but the holiday season is about more than buying crap for your friends and family and drinking yourself into oblivion with your co-workers. After all, if you’re privileged enough to be able to do things like that, it couldn’t hurt to give back, whether by volunteering or, in a much simpler act of kindness, donating to a food drive. The Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce has set up Brooklyn Eats Cares, a food drive with food banks and companies around Brooklyn, so stop by any one of them and donate something. Something good, not those possibly Soviet-era string beans you found when you moved into your apartment.

The Chamber of Commerce has partnered with six food banks around Brooklyn where you can drop food off from now until December 20:

Bedford Stuyvesant Campaign Against Hunger
2010 Fulton Street
(718) 773-3551

Coney Island Lighthouse Mission
2114 Mermaid Avenue
(718) 415-1170

Masbia
4114 14th Avenue
(718) 972-4446

New Hope Family Worship Center
817 Livonia Avenue
(718) 342-1305

Reaching Out Services
7708 New Utrecht Avenue
(718) 373-4565

Greenpoint Food Pantry and Soup Kitchen
136 Milton Street
(718) 383-5941

In addition to the food banks, you can also stop by a few additional places to drop off your canned goods:

Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce
335 Adams Street, Suite 2700
(718) 875-1000

Assemblyman Joseph Lentol – District Office
619 Lorimer Street
(718) 383-7474

Community Board 14 District Office (kosher food only)
810 East 16th Street
(718) 859-6357

All Car Rent-A-Car
335 Adams Street
1st Floor Parking Garage
(347) 226-6933

All Car Rent-A-Car
61 Warren Street
(347) 226-6931

Terra CRG
592 Pacific Street
(718) 768-6888

The Chamber said other businesses will be added to the site as time goes on, so keep checking to see if a place near you hops on the giving wagon. And don’t forget, if you don’t have canned goods, you can also donate cash, which can’t be eaten, but can be traded for other goods that are edible.