It’s time to celebrate Brooklynites who are “Rooted in NYC”

td-bank-rooted-in-nyc

Sponsored By TD Bank.

TD Forests: Rooted In NYC is a program spotlighting New Yorkers committed to improving their urban environment and their communities.

Nearly 14 percent of New York City is covered in green spaces, and many of the city’s most verdant spots are right here in Brooklyn.

You may spend a lot of time in the borough’s public parks, especially in the summer, but do you know who’s responsible for creating and maintaining them? According to a recent study from TD Bank, you might not.

The environmentally conscious bank recently released findings from its first “Rooted In NYC” survey, which revealed that 98 percent of Brooklynites believe that natural areas are important to the health of their community. However, more than half (53 percent) don’t know who to thank for keeping our green spaces beautiful and accessible.

That’s why TD Bank launched “TD Forests: Rooted In NYC” an initiative that celebrates New Yorkers who are greening their communities. Rooted in NYC is part of TD Bank’s TD Forests program, which preserves and supports urban green spaces and critical habitats across North America. The bank is also the lead sponsor of the MillionTreesNYC initiative, which aims to plant one million trees in New York by ear’s end—you’ve probably seen the stickers (and the trees) all over your neighborhood.

Filming videos across the five boroughs, TD Bank’s Mobile Forest—a living, breathing forest on wheels—has been giving New Yorkers the opportunity to share stories about what the city’s green spaces mean to them and give shout-outs to people they know who are “Rooted In NYC.”

Recent videos feature the Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s new Discovery Garden and an interview with Richard Cabo, the director of the Arthur Ross Nursery in Brooklyn who nursed the 9/11 “Survivor Tree” back to health, as seen in the video above. (You can check out the rest of the videos here.)

Want to brag about your favorite Brooklyn park or celebrate someone who has helped keep your neighborhood green? Share your thoughts on social media using #RootedInNYC!