Sixpoint debuts Occupation Ale, for peaceful assemblers everywhere

Drafted for Occupation

Does the idea of drinking the “King of Beers” make you want to pull out a copy of Common Sense? If so, the good people over at Sixpoint Brewing Company may be taking some of the pain(e) out of the plight of 99 percent. About a month ago, Sixpoint began providing protesters with fresh water from kegs cleaned at its Brooklyn facility. Now it seems like Sixpoint is upping the ante by releasing Occupation Ale, a floral and citrusy amber to wash down the bitter taste of social injustice. But Sixpoint’s president says the beer “is not necessarily honoring the people behind Occupy Wall Street.” So who’s it for then?

Sixpoint’s Shane Welch says the beer is honoring people who feel the spirit of “occupation” everywhere. He told us:
The beer is not necessarily honoring the people behind Occupy Wall Street, it’s in honor of anyone (regardless of political affiliation or intent) who use the means of peaceful assembly to protest in light of oppression or daunting odds. It could be Occupy Wall Street, or it could be the Gandhi Salt March. But the common theme must be peaceful assembly and protest — never aligning with violence. An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind.
So there you have it: beer for anyone trying to change the world through non-violence. Does that mean Occupation is becoming a state of mind?
[Workers at Bierkraft in Park Slope originally told Brokelyn the beer was a reincarnation of its controversial “Hop Obama” amber ale from 2008, but Sixpoint says that is not true.]

Bierkraft has been pouring it over the last week and plans to tap some new kegs of it this weekend (keep an eye on their Twitter feed for updates).

I gave it a taste: it was good, but not particularly distinctive; hoppy, but not too fruity. It probably goes perfectly with this list of anti-1 percent movies.

Occupation Ale is available at Bierkraft in Park Slope ($5 for 16 oz, $7.95 for 22 oz, or $11.95 for a 64 oz).

Follow Andrew: @lindermania.

Tim Donnelly contributed to this report.