Real talk: Pregnant and uninsured in NYC

Wait, I need to fill out how many forms? via Total Mobile.

Wait, I need to fill out how many forms? via Total Mobile.

Today in real talk: it’s extremely hard to be pregnant and uninsured. Actually, it’s really hard to be anything and uninsured. Because of a lack of resources and a seeming total unwillingness to make healthcare affordable or accessible, it’s easy to believe that the government wouldn’t care if we all just languished in the gutters, or starved, or gave birth in a manger. Resources are few and far between, and they all probably involve paperwork and lines and days spent in waiting rooms, but they’re around here…somewhere.

Part of the problem likely stems from the fact that pregnancy seems to be regarded by insurance companies as a pre-existing condition and by employers as a disability. Daisy Egan learned that people don’t drop everything and insure pregnant women out in California, instead tossing them into a social services vortex.

So if even the youngest Tony-winner ever can’t seem to get any help, what hope do you have? Every solid once in a while though, someone out there realizes how screwed up all of this is. Here are some resources to look into if you’re pregnant, uninsured, and living in New York City. Some programs (mainly the government-subsidized ones) come with income requirements.

MEDICAID
From their website:
“Prenatal Care Services through Medicaid is a comprehensive prenatal care program that offers complete pregnancy care and other health services to women and teens who live in New York State and meet income guidelines. Health insurance is available for pregnant women regardless of their immigration status.”
More information here.

WOMEN, INFANTS, AND CHILDREN (WIC)
From their website: 
“WIC provides supplemental foods, healthcare referrals, nutrition education, and breastfeeding promotion and support to low-income pregnant, breastfeeding, and postpartum women, and to infants and children up to age five who are found to be at nutritional risk.” There are income requirements.
More information here.

WOMEN’S HEALTH FREE CLINIC
From their website: “The Women’s Health Free Clinic (WHFC) became the nation’s first comprehensive, free, student-run women’s health clinic when it opened in February 2008. The clinic is a partnership between New York University School of Medicine, the Reproductive Health Access Project, and the Institute for Family Health.”
More information here.

INSTITUTE FOR FAMILY HEALTH
From their website:
“We provide quality healthcare services that meet the unique needs of women throughout their lives. Our family physicians, nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, ob/gyns and other specialists, as well as our health educators, nutritionists, social workers, and behavioral health providers, work together to provide comprehensive and holistic care to women of all ages.” Pre-natal care is included, and there are several locations in Manhattan and the Bronx.
More information here.

2 Comment

  • to be fair, in 20,000 BC, every human on earth was insured, unemployed, and had to barter for health care services.

    If only they could speaka-da-english they would have had better opportunities.

    • College-educated, English-speaking, 60-hour-a-week freelance worker here, uninsured and pregnant. Take your head out of your ass; speaking English is certainly not the key to opportunity in 2013 America.