Considering squatting? Take a class first

Bedford Ave. squatters, via The Daily News.

When you’re the most down and out, you’ve got a few options to pay the rent: aside from ditching the single life, or declaring the 20-something equivalent of bankruptcy and moving in with the parents, you could take a route that’s been returning to prominence recently: squatting in those myriad half-finished condos lining Williamsburg and elsewhere. Hm, actually that does sound like a better (though not exactly legal) alternative to moving back to Jersey. But how do you go from traditionally homed rent payer to aspiring gutter punk?  There’s a class for that: a “Squat the Condos” class April 10, described as “a practical workshop on squatting and direct action that will take us all from curious dilettante to eager amateur.” But do you really need a class in this? Teacher Christopher Robbins fills us in.

Robbins, who describes his work as being at the cusp of art and community development, built his own hut out of mud and sticks and lived in it while part of the Peace Corps in West Africa and spoke at a United Nations conference about his cross-cultural digital arts and education work in the South Pacific, among many other accolades.

Robbins tells us he’s offering the class — titled “SQUAT THE CONDOS! How to be a counter-culture dilettante” — more as an instigator than a pro. So what does it take to be a successful squatter anyway? [UPDATE: Looks like he's on to something: the class was listed as full this morning].

“There are number of things to do to establish a presence (start to get mail sent to you at the address, get utilities hooked up in your name, etc),” he says. But Robbins says to keep in mind the class is also about cultivating a renewed counter-culture movement.

“It’s all about running with the basic essentials and learning by doing, together,” he says. “Realistically, I see the class as a way to get some NPR gang into direct action — channel some Abbie Hoffman into 2011.”

Classes at the LES-based Trade School, a pop-up education center, run through April 17 and work on a nominal barter system from students (Robbins listed things like apples as potential payment from his students).

So how about it: would you ever take a class in squatting, or would you just wing it with a cardboard sign and a prayer? Has squatting ever been in the realm of possibility for you?

 

7 Comment

  • Im a cheap bastard… well, I buy good stuff but lets just say i try to stretch my buck… it seems like this blog is moving from the cheapskate cool stuff to do/buy/get for free blog, to the homeless/sad/poor/desperate/no-internet-access blog.

    but while were on that thread, why not squat in some of the abandoned williamsburg waterfront buildings?

    check the squatin goin on in venezuela:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/01/world/americas/01venezuela.html

  • But Branson, if it’s for the no-internet access crowd, how are they reading this blog?

  • good eye Tim

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  • It’s always amusing to me that the punk, hipster, or otherwise zealously “alternative” folks are surprised they can’t get a job…

    I know, I know, it’s not pleasing, but being covered in tattoos, piercings, ‘creative’ hairstyles, torn/shredded clothing, leather, spikes, chains, etc…. well, let’s just say it’s not the first choice for the manager at Applebee’s! And guess what, not the first choice for someone presenting a new organizational image portfolio to a non-profit. Not everyone can be a rock star or great artiste. Well, I guess everyone can pretend to be, just don’t expect to pay your rent or be able to afford your hair gel and Manic Panic dye.

    I like the title of the course — “How to be a counter-culture dilettante” — really sums it up!

  • Holy crap a class for squatting? Are you serious? This is so ridiculous and stupid. Are Hipsters gonna become squatters now. Please leave squatting to Real squatters/gutter punks. Not some lame wannabe’s.

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