Introducing your newest addiction: Gorilla Coffee’s cold-brew to-go

Tje brand-new cold brew to-go, hitting shelves on June 14. Photos by Tim.

For all you folks with discerning coffee palates who can barely stomach those bottles of sickly sweet Starbucks’ to-go Frappuccino, you’re about to get a brand-new alternative. Park Slope caffeinated mainstay Gorilla Coffee is introducing its own to-go cold brew containers on June 14. The 11-oz. cartons will sell for about $4 in Union Market, Whole Foods throughout the Northeast,  in addition to the Park Slope store. Co-owner Carol McLaughlin said the idea to make it came from her frustration at not being able to find a decent cup of joe while on her frequent travels.

“I don’t need to go where good coffee is,” she said. “I take it with me.”

The packaging for the cold brew aseptic technique and is hermetically sealed, which means the coffee has a shelf life of a year. And the ingredients? Coffee, water, and that’s it; no preservatives or anything. It doesn’t have to be refrigerated and can be heated up if you prefer some hot java for your summa.

Co-owner Darleen Scheer also told us that while you can already buy Gorilla beans in Whole Foods around the region, this release will expand Gorilla’s reach even farther.

Iced coffee picnic cocktails this summer, anyone?

8 Comment

  • Is that a coffee concentrate?

  • Cold brew is great, but I haven’t tried this brand yet.


    • oof. I would like to blame the confusion on years of working at Trader Joe’s, where pallets haunted my nightmares.

  • As a ‘to go’ option this is a great idea, BUT this is how Gorilla is serving ALL their “iced coffee” now. Meaning, if you go to Gorilla and order an ice coffee even to stay, they hand you a box of pre-made coffee. If you ask, they will give you a cup of ice.

    Horrible, horrible idea on so many levels. First of all, I’m not a treehugging hippie, but how many thousands of ice coffees does Gorilla serve in a year? Now, for each one they sell, an individual serving size cardboard box is produced and thrown out. Why would that be a good idea? I can only imagine what the park slope co-oper type think about that.

    But, more importantly to me, if I go somewhere and order an iced coffee, I don’t want to be handed a juice box full of pre-made coffee that was made who knows when. Not to mention that handing someone a cup of ice and expecting them to pour their own coffee at a coffee shop is pretty obnoxious (even by Gorilla standards).