YOU can shape the future of Fort Tilden, so speak up

fort tilden

The future of summah is in your hands. via Flickr user Todd Shirley

As you know, Fort Tilden took one mean whacking during Hurricane Sandy. We were pretty excited when they reopened last summer after having been all closed and sad in 2013, but there’s still lots of work to be done down there. The National Park Service is working hard to make Fort Tilden an accessible, useable place for The People, but they need your help to know what The People need. Which is why they’re seeking your feedback on how to make Fort Tilden even more glorious than it was before mother nature bellyflopped on it.

We spoke with Daphne Yun, who’s leading the project at Gateway National Recreation Area and who told us the only people who had been coming to meetings were fishermen and Breezy Point residents. While we’re down with both groups, Yun said the Park Service wanted more feedback from Brooklynites, since they know we’ll be flocking to the shore in scrawny droves come May. For some reason when we imagine Fort Tilden designed exclusively by fishermen we imagine it’ll play out like a cross between On the Waterfront and Showboat. We’re kind of into it the more we think about it, but democracy is important which is why you should send your suggestions on how the area should be used by submitting comments here by March 20.

Yun told us she haven’t started any work yet and are still in the initial information gathering stages, so your input could really have an impact here. The Park Service wants help coming up with alternative uses for the area (or you could tell them to leave things as they are), rebuilding the area with a more cultural and historical focus, or focusing more heavily on public programming. We have a really detailed napkin drawing of a giant water slide spanning the length of the Gil Hodges Bridge that we’d like to see built there, so you can bet Brokelyn’s voice will be heard. Just remember, if you don’t make your voice heard, they may have to turn to the city’s default development option and replace the ocean with condos.